Heroes among us

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A hero is a man who is known to have sacrificed his personal ambitions and achieved a greater measure of success for the greater good of others. A heroine is the term used when we refer to women of such great strength.  I think that people who fought for human rights are more than heroes. Heroism to me implies unmatched strength from a selfless individual for the greater good of the wider society. In our society, hero, heroine or heroism is used to refer to those individuals who in different ways affect or influence our lives positively. Consequently, we see heroism in combat, athletics, soccer, leadership and religion just to mention a few.

Martin King was a human right activist who was the president of the Southern leadership christen conference at the time he wrote the book. Heroism is expressed in the manner king starts of his letter in a sentimental mood. One can’t fail to point out that Kings identifies himself with the injustices all over Birmingham when he alludes to the Biblical story of Apostle Paul. We also note the symbolic nature of kings character to compare himself to the messengers of the truth in the olden days. He expresses his desire to fight for those who are still captives of their masters his freedom notwithstanding.

We are made to understand the academic prowess of Martin King. Interestingly, he resolved to abandon the comfort of his home, the warmth of his family and security of a job to agitates for the rights of the oppressed. As such,heroism acts of King cannot be under-estimated.Kings argue that had he been there during the ill-fated era of Adolf Hitler, when Jews were persecuted, he would have defended his brothers at whatever cost. Kings argument conceptualize a man ready to sacrifice his freedom for the sake of others. Such selfless feats bespeaks of a man whose calling is synonymous to a freedom fighter. He laments the hypocrisy of his fellow white church leaders who he accuses of a double standard. He questions their honest in liberating the blacks. King argues that his fellow church leaders are not sincere in their guest.

From the liberal world, heroism is associated with acts of peace, honest, denial, and an endless desire for fairness. When he write his letter that he addressed to the eight white religious leaders, King identifies with peaceful, nonviolent means in resolving the stalemate. He writes expressing his deep feelings for the suffering Negroes in a candid way that leaves no doubt of his call to save mankind. He concludes his letter in rather a melancholic tone that leaves no doubt of his heroism.

Outcast by Claude McKay

McKay was a writer and a poet who was half America and half Jamaican. He lived between 1889 to 1948. He lived during a period when racism was the order of the day. As a poet and a writer, McKay, like King, dedicated his life to champion the grievances of the blacks. In the outcast, and expresses a desire to go back to Africa where there is peace. McKay uses poetry to show his displeasure of the white domination in a multiracial world. The poet reminiscence the old days living in the dark Africa. The poet talks of the suffering the black under the racist American to the point of singing forgotten jungle songs. He goes ahead to mourn with his fellow Africans who went to America in search of a better life but ended in a worse state. He cries of shattered dreams that are a monster that hovered over Africans during the racist era. Like King, McKay is a man who stood for black at a time when it was hostile for the race. Moreover, he identifies himself with the suffering blacks and takes the mantle of emancipation.

It is a case of two human rights activist who lived in different periods. However, their working in emancipation of the blacks should not be overlooked. Their tireless and relentless efforts bore fruits among the suffering blacks. Though they never lived to witness the fruits of their efforts, the Black celebrate them. McKay and King provide typical examples of selfless leaders who lived to see better days of the oppressed. I have managed to read some other works by McKay and his chosen theme of racism stands out. His work is a tale of a fighter with a tremendous desire for the liberty of his fellow human beings. Though both McKay and King wrote their respective works more than half a decade ago, the influence of their work lives on. It is fair to conclude that the campaigns of the early activists to create a harmonious world for all materialized when blacks gained freedom from the whites. The two writers represent heroes of the 19nth century.

Crips, Bloods and Social Justice

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Racism

Growing up in the Streets of Los Angeles Black Americans had this belief that one day they would be emancipated from the mental slavery that engulfed their generations. One of the extraordinary challenges that supposedly contained their dreams was the concept of racism.

Crips The extensive gangs research paper indicates that African Americans still face the prejudice problem. They are still under suspicion. Racism has one of the most profound conflicts ever experienced in the world history. According to Crips and Bloods gang, their main ambition was to outdo the social injustices posed by them in particular through the police in the generations that they lived. It didn’t matter how many lives were lost, but their course was quite extraordinary. In the beginning, Bird says that when he went to join the boy’s scout to live the American dream he was met with one of the scout heads who according to him was very nice. But then, came the problem of color because according to the commander of the scouts all the boys in his group were white and Bird was black. The leader felt the parents of the kids by then 1959 were going to reject their children associating with a black kid, or rather a black person. It walloped him that even with him he felt there was a challenge. Kumasi felt they could not be boys’ scouts or anything because of the problem of racism. The scouts were a bunch of American racists who never cared about anything else but themselves.

Marxist Theory of Conflict

The Marxist theory of conflict is inherent in this documentary. From the beginning, it is evident that the groups rely on conflict of races to be seen as useful in the groups. From the onset, Kumasi says the question of identity pulled his subconscious realization that he as a walking time bomb. Being that he is from the larger majority who lack a means of production, he foresaw a revolution just like what Karl Marx had envisaged in his theory of conflict. For Kumasi, the police brutality against the black men at that was some conflict in the making just like what had happened in the French revolution. The many people who were poor were being chained by the few who controlled state power apparatus, and this promulgated into some widespread hatred which in many sense could not be restrained any further. Therefore they foresaw a reaction to force that was pushing them against the wall all the time. In here was a revolution between two groups the African Americans against the white Americans an idea that never escaped their minds at any single moment. The civil rights movement in the sixties was the culmination of what Marx had promised in his theory where Martin Luther King Jr. decided to walk the streets of Alabama just to show that all black just like any other white American has a right to walk on streets as any citizen.

Power Struggles
The issue of power was also evident in the documentary from the onset. Ron Wilkins describes how he his ideology of black liberation in the neighborhood got a backing from the followers. He understood the meaning of having numbers when forming the club and therefore had to rely on it to fight for social injustices that were inherent in the community from the white people. Mayor of Los Angeles felt that the black people were only using the historical, social injustices as a measure of their power. The increased rates of criminal gangs in the region only demonstrated how the groups viewed violence as a way to achieve power. But then the reality of the matter is that American government uses force especially against the minority groups and then tries to legitimize the violence. The uprising that was seen on the streets of Watts in 1965 was just a demonstration of how power can change hands and hen one group that has been oppressed for a long tends to realize the desire for this influence war always erupts. Interestingly alienation and rejection were the order of the day, and many felt that there was no need to respect the rule of the powerful in society. Civilization through the rule of law was not going to be respected for many felt that society viewed the black race as an obstacle to development and not as a forceful advancement to both economic and political growth in every measure of United States.

Crime and Deviance
Deviance and crime are the best sociological concept that can define the high degree of police arrest based on race. Incarcerations were the most challenging problems that controlled the city of Los Angeles. Based on the idea of racism, black males were viewed as a group who most capable of committing crime at any given moment. The larger majority of them saw the police as deterrence to conformity. In the more famous city, the police were controlled by Chief Parker who Bird says controlled the police system like some form of military unit. Deviance was not acceptable to him, and the high-handedness of Parker met any individual who created some confusion in public through deviance. He crushed any form of resistance, and many lives were lost. Men and even women were treated as enemies and not citizens of America and so the military system would be used to control the masses. No one had a choice but to conform to the realities of the system which in every aspect was very dictatorial and militaristic. The east of Alameda was a no crossing zone, and blacks who tried to cross the white curtain were met with police brutality of the highest pedigree. Barriers existed in the system, and the police job was to enforce the obstacles by all means.

Poverty
Poverty was the most undoing factor that led to the revolutionary spirit on the streets of Watts in 1965. For a long time, blacks were extradited from having to accessing the areas that white men controlled. Therefore social services were only limited to the whites and many black people had to find themselves living in poor neighborhoods with little sanitation and dilapidated streets. Children grew up knowing that society sees them as aliens and therefore thy have to depend on other means to survive and therefore crime was the order of the day. In every respect of it never materialized that one day these black men could come to the helms of power since the experienced poor pays in factory jobs and many never enjoyed better education just like the whites did in that time. In the slavery era, black people primarily lived in the south while the rest of the population made up the northern states. But then even with these conditions, they felt that one day they will be part of an American society and live their American dreams. It took them generations to realize this disadvantage, but that is as far as it goes. Today, black gangs such as the gang of Crips and Blood use violence and guns as a measure of survival in poverty stricken neighborhoods of Los Angeles. Kids as young as twelve gain access to guns and people kill each other in a vicious cycle of blood birth and drug war supremacy. The ones who manage to survive live off to tell their stories to next generations but then poverty remains one issue that cannot be settled in a day.

Crips and Bloods, is a documentary about the social injustices black Americans endured, in the hands of the white majority America. The documentary fosters its thinking on the African American belief that liberation was only through a revolution and this was showcased in Watts and the subsequent civil rights activism that occurred the same year. People still believe Black Americans are the most vulnerable minority groups regarding racism, deviance and even access to services such as education and legal counsel because they have no access to power. The same power deficiency was the reason what the documentary was addressing by locating its thesis from the slavery epoch to the current power differences between the white and the blacks.