THE CALUMET MURAL PROJECT 2012

The Three point niners will be starting a mural project on July 16th 2012. This mural will be located at 2001 Bryant and 18th street in the Mission district.

This mural will be funded by Calumet and will be a collaboration with Precita Eyes (www.precitaeyes.org)and the 3.9 art collective (www.threepointninecollective.com).

Lead artist: SIRRON NORRIS

“My hope with this project, is to reach out to other artists and arts organizations in my community through collaboration. I also want to inspire my interns and give them one of the biggest challenges in their artistic life. On a personal note: this will be one for the books and will push my talent and experience to it’s fullest. I know the team I have at the gallery and the invaluable experience Precita eyes has, will help accomplish this massive undertaking. Keep posted for updates as we move closer to starting.”

MURAL UPDATE: SF master muralists Jet Martinez & Apex will join us on the Calumet mural project!

Make Good Use of Your Sidebar Member websites: William Rhodes Nancy Cato Ron Saunders Rodney Ewing Sirron Norris Sammuel Fleming Lewis Melonie J. Green Ako Jacintho THREE POINT NINE COLLECTIVE UPCOMING SHOWS

Please join us for :The Exodus. The Migration. The Stand.

African American Art & Culture Complex

 May 17, 2012 – October 11, 2012

Opening Reception: May 17, 2012 – October 11, 2012

Sargent Johnson Gallery (1st Floor)

762 Fulton Street
San Francisco, CA 94102

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MAKING RACE MODERNISM AND “RACIAL ART” IN AMERICA

University Press Books, University of Washington Press and the 2430 Arts Alliance invite you to join Jacqueline Francis for a reading and discussion of her new book Making Race: Modernism and “Racial Art in America Thursday, 29 March 2012, 6:00 – 7:30 PM UNIVERSITY PRESS BOOKS 2430 BANCROFT WAY (between Telegraph & Dana), BERKELEY “Francis’s subject is not only these three artists, but encompasses as well broader issues of how social identities are constructed at particular historical moments and the complex relationships among racial and ethnic identity positions, critical reception, patronage, and artistic style.” – Melanie Herzog, author of Milton Rogovin: The Making of a Social Documentary Photographer Malvin Gray Johnson, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, and Max Weber were three New York City artists whose work was popularly assigned to the category of “racial art” in the interwar years of the twentieth century. The term was widely used by critics and the public at the time, and was an unexamined, unquestioned category for the work of non-whites (such as Johnson, an African American), non-Westerners (such as Kuniyoshi, a Japanese-born American), and ethnicized non-Christians (such as Weber, a Russian-born Jewish American). The discourse on racial art is a troubling chapter in the history of early American modernism that has not, until now, been sufficiently documented. Jacqueline Francis juxtaposes the work of these three artists in order to consider their understanding of the category and their stylistic responses to the expectations created by it, in the process revealing much about the nature of modernist art practices. Most American audiences in the interwar period disapproved of figural abstraction and held modernist painting in contempt, yet the critics who first expressed appreciation for Johnson, Kuniyoshi, and Weber praised their bright palettes and energetic pictures – and expected to find the residue of the minority artist’s heritage in the work itself. Francis explores the flowering of racial art rhetoric in the 1920s and 1930s, and analyzes its underlying presence in contemporary discussions of artists of color. Making Race is a history of a past phenomenon which has significant ramifications for the present. Jacqueline Francis is a senior lecturer at the California College of the Arts, San Francisco. www.universitypressbooks.

RODNEY EWING: MISSION OPEN STUDIOS

New Original Art Work
Dear Friends and Supporters,

I will be participating in Mission Open Studios. This will be a great opportunity for you to preview my new work “Rituals of Water” in progress for my solo exhibition in March of 2013 at IcTus Gallery.

“Rituals of Water” is a body of work that will reflect how the African Diaspora has been influenced by the element of water. The work will document its presence in the following capacities: TransAtlantic Slavery, Baptism, Civil Rights, and Hurricane Katrina.

Limited Edition Prints

I will also have on display limited edition woodcuts that I have created over the past year. The three editions that will be available reflect many of the themes and ideas that are in my larger original works, but on a more managable scale.

Each of the three editions that I have available are all hand pulled with edition sizes ranging from 5-14,

Small Drawings

Those of you who are familiar with my work, you know it’s scale can be a little…daunting. So with this in mind, I will also have some smaller works available for purchase. These pieces range from 11×14 inches (such as  “Trepedation” to the left) to 22×30 inches. If you have admired my larger works and did not have the space or budget, this is an opportunity to own an original at a great price.

I hope to see you soon,

~Rodney

THE EXODUS. THE MIGRATION. THE STAND

Thu, May 17 — Thu, Oct 11
Opening Reception: May 17, 2012 – October 11, 2012 6-8pm

This exhibition is about the Black San Franciscans of yesteryear, their departure, and the story of those who remain. According to the 2010 census, the African American population dropped to 3.9% which is devastating to a community that once thrived in various neighborhoods of San Francisco.

On the heels of the “Still Here” exhibition, at the Sirron Norris Studio Gallery, the Three Point Nine Art Collective (Nancy Cato, Rodney Ewing, Sirron Norris, William Rhodes, and Ron Moultrie Saunders) will use art to interpret what this decline in population means for a community and a city that prides itself on its cultural diversity.

AFRICAN AMERICAN ART & CULTURE COMPLEX

LOCATION:
762 Fulton Street
San Francisco, CA 94102